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20130115
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will sign the measure into law. >>> and tonight, in further breaking news, as slow as house republicans were to act in response to hurricane sandy, tonight's other major news is about how fast new york state was able to move to respond to a different kind of disaster. tonight one month and one day after the mass shooting at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut, a town that is only about nine miles from the new york-connecticut border, tonight the state of new york has become the first state in the country since that tragedy to reform its gun laws. and it reformed its gun laws dramatically. as of tonight, as of tonight, new york has just enacted the toughest set of gun laws in the country. the state senate, which is run by a republican-dominated coalition passed the measure last night by a vote of 43-18. that was last night. then it was this afternoon the heavily democratic assembly voting. the margin in the assembly was 144-43. and then tonight, less than an hour after it won final passage in the legislature, governor andrew cuomo signed it, signed it into law. parts of it ta
a sweeping gun law. what it is going to do is submit gun owners to fingerprinting. it will ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, require gun safety courses and background checks. he goes further than his democratic governor, and anthony o'donnell tells "outfront" the reality is martin o'malley is trying to get to the left of cuomo in new york because he wants to run for president in 2016. eric, former obama administration official rosa brooks, and our legal analyst, paul cowin. martin o'malley not the only politician who has 2016 ambitions who is stepping out in the gun law fray. louisiana republican governor bobby jindal wants a law to keep guns away from the mentally ill. how much is this push really about positioning for 2016? >> i think some of it definitely is about 2016. some of it is they want to be doing something. they hope if they're seen as doing something now, by 2016, the particulars may be forgotten, particularly by gun rights advocates and a lot in the democratic party as well as the republican party. they'll look at them as doing something. i don't think we s
. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no criminal records who want to die. these are adult facts that don't intrude on the childish world of white house policy making. he notes adam lanza in newtown, his own mother of course passed a background check. >> here's the bottom line. these laws are not perfect. and you'll always find certain exceptions. but they make a huge difference. every major person who has studied the brady law, which is the most significant gun safety law we've passed in the last 20 years has said it has reduced gun violence dramatically. law enforcemen
under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right this. and he talked about stonewall. talking about stonewall in an inaugural address, i was really profoundly moved by that. this is not just saying okay, these people helped elect me. this is saying this is a commitment. we're expanding the vision of dr. martin luther king jr. and we're talking about equal rights for all of us. he is talking about seneca falls. he is talking about women's rights and equal pay. and this was a very forward-looking, progressive, inclusive speech. >> i will say as a gay person that i am used to gay people being name checked in speeches, put in a list of demographic groups that you want to shout out to recognize that we exist, which is always nice. but to have the president articulate why the fight, the continuing struggle, the not at all settled struggle for equal rights is an american project, and to have that delivered from the inaugural lectern was i think -- felt personally was moving to me personally. but i also felt like
journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. >> in many ways, this speech was progressives. this is what we have been waiting for to hear for four years. the president is older now, and certainly wiser to the position about how washington works. but at least for today he will not let trivial politics derail the progressive course that this country is on. president obama looked out to the crowd on the national mall today and saw the full scope of america, young and old, rich and poor, black, white, hispanic, asian. he recognized the moment. he captured it. the mission he is charged with today is perhaps greater than his mission of four years ago. in 2009, he was of course there to lead us out of this economic tragedy that we were living in. in 2013, he needs to lead this country and make it the country that we all want to achieve. >> you and i as citizens had the power to set this country'
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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